Laurie Taylor – 26 January 2017

The official weekly newsletter of the University of Poppleton. Finem respice!

January 26, 2017
Polaroids of people with degrees

Trust me, I'm a teacher

Is it appropriate for people who have shown themselves incapable of baking an excellent vanilla cupcake to act as judge and jury in a vanilla cupcake competition?

That is the profound question raised by the news that although, in common with other UK universities, a quarter of all Poppleton graduates now obtain first-class degrees, these superb students have largely been taught by depressed academics with only upper and lower seconds.

However, our Head of Curriculum Development, Janet Fluellen, told our reporter, Keith Ponting (30), that there was “no problem” about this educational disparity. “Do we expect a vocal coach to sing as well as Pavarotti? Of course not. Do we expect Jo Johnson, the minister of state for universities, to have any idea at all about the true meaning and function of a university? Of course not.

“In fact,” said Ms Fluellen, “given that there has been no change in the entry qualifications of our undergraduates, their extraordinary success can only be due to the value added by their modestly qualified teachers.”

But, wondered Ponting, might not this dramatic nationwide increase in first-class degrees be more simply attributed to the manner in which it raised the status and league position of the awarding universities?

Ms Fluellen described this argument as "exactly the sort of deeply flawed reasoning that one might expect from a lower second reporter on a third-class newsletter".


Name tag
Source: 
iStock

God in the quad?

How should we address God? Adrian Thatcher, an honorary professor in the theology department at the University of Exeter, currently advises students to avoid such terms as “He”, “His” and “Him”, while the Oxford theological college, Wycliffe Hall, recommends that students select hymns in which “references to son” can readily be changed to the gender-neutral “child”.

So how is the Poppleton Department of Theology responding to this new gender-inclusive approach to God?

“We have every intention of doing something about it at some time in the relatively near future,” explained Head of Department the Very Reverend Professor Torrance. “It is not, however, a matter of great urgency as following recent political events in the USA, there is currently no one in the department who retains any sort of belief in a divine being.”

(The Very Reverend Professor Torrance holds a starred first in apologetics from the Christian University of La-La Land.)


A common enemy

Our thrusting Director of Corporate Affairs, Jamie Targett, has warmly welcomed the news that the prime minister, Theresa May, is to unveil a revolution in technical education that will see “a revival of the polytechnics”.

“In the old days,” explained Targett, “the polytechnics performed an absolutely vital service. They provided dons with a sentiment that allowed them to overlook the very worst features of their own university: ‘At least we don’t work in a poly.’”

lolsoc@dircon.co.uk

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

men in office with feet on desk. Vintage

Three-quarters of respondents are dissatisfied with the people running their institutions

A group of flamingos and a Marabou stork

A right-wing philosopher in Texas tells John Gill how a minority of students can shut down debates and intimidate lecturers – and why he backs Trump

A face made of numbers looks over a university campus

From personalising tuition to performance management, the use of data is increasingly driving how institutions operate

students use laptops

Researchers say students who use computers score half a grade lower than those who write notes

Canal houses, Amsterdam, Netherlands

All three of England’s for-profit universities owned in Netherlands