Kingston is told to lay off student

September 24, 2004

Kingston University has been served with a court injunction ordering it to stop harassing one of its disabled students.

The order made by Kingston upon Thames County Court on September 14, says the university is forbidden, whether itself or by instructing or encouraging any other person, to harass Francois Greeff. Failure to comply with an injunction can result in a fine, a prison sentence or both.

Mr Greeff, who has bipolar affective disorder, was studying for a masters degree in business studies. He was expelled from Kingston in July after a dispute that stretched back to last year, when he was found to be in breach of health and safety rules at his hall of residence. He was told to quit his room in February.

Mr Greeff, who spent years living rough, told the court that the university had twice changed the locks to his room and had cut off his water supply.

The university says there has been no harassment, stating that the locks had been changed because Mr Greeff had lost his keys and that the water had been turned off temporarily by workmen.

The university told The Times Higher that it had made every effort to resolve the dispute and had complied fully with the Disability Discrimination Act. It expelled Mr Greeff on the grounds of unacceptable behaviour towards staff and students.

University representatives will appear before the court on Tuesday to request the lifting of the injunction.

Mr Greeff's appeal against expulsion is due to be heard at the university on October 14.

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