Why is my professor still not black?

Winston Morgan explores what his career might reveal about the position of ethnic minority academics

March 14, 2016
Black academic in lecture theatre

British Science Week is a good time to try to find out who the black leaders of British science in 2016 are. It is also the second anniversary of the groundbreaking meeting at University College London asking the question: “Why isn’t my professor black?”

There are 8,300 professors of science, engineering and technology (SET) in the UK, and only 35 are black; a closer look will show that the majority of black professors did not go to school in the UK.

I recently spoke to a white professor colleague about the key figures involved in shaping his career; he was able to quickly reel off a list of individuals who had facilitated, mentored or sponsored his career. His experience as an aspiring scientist was positive; the main challenges were about the science and getting funding. As a reader, the key individuals in my career have, by contrast, been those who have either blocked or delayed my progress. The positive figures tended to be those who enabled me to recover from negative experiences. Much more of my time was spent defending myself against those who found it difficult to accept that I could be a good scientist. My experiences may not be typical of all black scientists, but the numbers mentioned above suggest that my experience is quite widespread.

A closer look at how you become a professor may provide some further clarification. To be considered for promotion to professor, you must be “suitably qualified”, normally by authoring a large number of “high-quality” publications, undertaking PhD supervisions and generating external funding. The next step is to gain support from your institution and then to find at least four referees who will support your application and certify that you are a leader in your field with an international reputation. To gain such support requires building large internal and external networks. For many reasons, not enough black academics work in institutions where such reputations and networks are made, significantly reducing the possibility of being promoted to professor.

I also spoke to a female professor, and her experiences were closer to mine. However, there are important differences, and this is reflected in the fact that the number of female professors has doubled in recent years. One explanation is the divergent responses to sexism and racism in modern society and in academia. It is far easier in academia to gain acceptance that sexism is widespread, and the historically lower numbers of female professors can be attributed to various structural obstacles amounting to “institutional” sexism. Consequently, there is less resistance when taking effective actions including initiatives such as Athena Swan. By contrast, it has been far more difficult to gain acceptance that racism or even unconscious bias exists in academia.

The progress of professors from other minority ethnic groups also highlights what can be done where there is a strategic or economic driver. As higher education institutions scramble for more international students, they have come to realise the value of having professors, either home-grown or imported, from certain ethnic backgrounds. The result is that today professors make up roughly one in 10 Asian academic staff – the same ratio as white professors – compared with over one in 30 for black staff.

There is no doubt that having black leaders and professors in SET subjects is essential if we want to encourage more black students to study science at school and university, and then to go into SET careers. The examples of women and other minority ethnic professors suggest that major change comes only when there are wider social, political and economic drivers ensuring that change takes place. Until then, we should be celebrating the few black leaders of British science and ensuring that their work is known to the widest possible audience.

Winston Morgan is reader in toxicology and clinical biochemistry at the University of East London. British Science Week runs until 20 March.

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Reader's comments (2)

For the 2013-14 academic year there were 100 Black professors and of these only 20 were women, so it is absolutely not the case that Black women benefit from gender equality initiatives like Athena Swan. To the contrary, such initiatives are largely created for and benefit white women. Intersectional experiences such as race, gender and class are ignored. Our Black Sister Network project aims to extend understanding on how women of colour survive and thrive in British academia. http://blacksisternetwork.blackbritishacademics.co.uk/projects/women-academics-of-colour/
Why doesn't the Times Higher EVER register the reality of the MA Black British Writing (the first research degree in the field in the world) especially as it is in its second year of being offered at Goldsmiths, University of London? This positive inroad is continually ignored in all media... WHY????? www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-black-british-writing Follow us on Twitter BlackWriteGold

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Assistant Recruitment - Human Resources Office

University Of Nottingham Ningbo China

Outreach Officer

Gsm London

Professorship in Geomatics

Norwegian University Of Science & Technology -ntnu

Professor of European History

Newcastle University

Head of Department

University Of Chichester
See all jobs

Most Commented

men in office with feet on desk. Vintage

Three-quarters of respondents are dissatisfied with the people running their institutions

students use laptops

Researchers say students who use computers score half a grade lower than those who write notes

Canal houses, Amsterdam, Netherlands

All three of England’s for-profit universities owned in Netherlands

As the country succeeds in attracting even more students from overseas, a mixture of demographics, ‘soft power’ concerns and local politics help explain its policy

sitting by statue

Institutions told they have a ‘culture of excluding postgraduates’ in wake of damning study