UK student traffic among the home nations

October 2, 2014

About 30,000 students starting an undergraduate degree this year have decided to pursue it in a different UK country from where they live.

The most popular cross-­border manoeuvre is from England to Wales. More than one-third (10,590) of all students who switch home nation will take this route, according to an assessment of student acceptances by Ucas. About 8,000 students from Wales will travel in the opposite direction to study at English universities.

More than 4,000 young people will leave Northern Ireland to study in England and Scotland, according to the data published on 23 September. But only 500 English and Scottish students have opted to study for a degree at a university in Northern Ireland.

About 1,500 Scots have decided to study at an English institution, whereas three times that number of English students are moving to Scotland to pursue an undergraduate degree. 

holly.else@tesglobal.com

 

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