THE Alma Mater Index: Global Executives 2013 methodology and results

September 5, 2013

Each CEO’s education has been researched using executive biographies from sources such as company websites (current, previous or non-executive director companies), company press offices, current or previous company or third-party company-authorised press releases, university alumni announcements, university press offices, industry association websites, conference speaker biographies or news sources (eg, Fortune, Forbes, Bloomberg, Reuters). Where company or university information is not available, news sources have, where possible, been verified with another source.

The placement of institutions has used the following hierarchy: the total number of degrees awarded to CEOs; the total number of CEO alumni; the total revenue of the alumni CEOs’ companies.

The methodology was as follows:

  • CEO(s) are as listed by Fortune in the Fortune Global 500 2013, published in Fortune’s 22 July 2013 issue.
  • Where joint CEOs for one company are listed, we have endeavoured to include both alma mater(s) where the information can be found, but revenue for the company is counted only once if the CEOs share an alma mater.
  • Where one CEO is listed for two companies, the institutions are counted only once, but the revenue for both companies is counted.
  • Where a CEO has two degrees from the same institution, the revenue is counted only once.
  • Where a CEO is working a notice period and the incoming CEO is known, the individual listed by Fortune has been used. Where a new CEO was in post at the time of publication, but his or her predecessor was named in the Fortune Global 500 2013, we have used the CEO listed by Fortune.
  • Executive education (eg, short-course management programme) or other courses (eg, higher nationals) that have not resulted in a degree are not included.
  • Where the degree-awarding institution has been subsumed into another institution or has changed name, the current name has been used.
  • Revenue has been calculated using US$ billion to one decimal point.
  • Management schools have been listed under the parent institution.
  • Where a CEO has dropped out of a degree, the institution has not been counted for that instance.
  • Where information has not been found, companies have been contacted directly, but not all have responded.

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