Argentine universities at heart of sustainable mobiles project

New international consortium tackles major energy challenge

January 10, 2017
Smart phone interaction battery icon with power effect
Source: iStock
Might nanotechnology enable us to capture some of the energy lost by mobile phones?

Scientists from three Argentine institutions are at the heart of a new research project designed to reduce energy consumption in mobile phones.

Known as “Spin, Conversion, Logic and Storage in Oxide-Based Electronics” or “Spicolost”, the initiative focuses on developing thin films and nanostructures to optimise the performance of current devices and decrease energy consumption without increasing costs. It will also explore ways of recovering some of the energy lost in the form of heat.

To help meet this major environmental challenge, scientists from Argentina’s National University of San Martín, National Technological University and National Atomic Energy Commission have joined forces with a group of eight universities and research centers with a proven track record in nanotechnology. Other participants come from France, Japan, Spain and Switzerland.

Spicolost is initially a four-year project and has received funding from the European Union of more than €700,000 (£610,000).

matthew.reisz@tesglobal.com

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