Odds and quads

Until the age of slides and computer displays, printed wallcharts and three-dimensional models were essential teaching tools within universities. Many combined scientific accuracy with great beauty and artistic skill. These are just some of the most striking examples from the extensive collection held by the University of Dundee's museum.

January 17, 2013




The anatomy of the Roman snail is explained in one of the 39 wallcharts by Paul Pfurtscheller (1855-19), most of them published in 1926. The quince flower being pollinated by a bee comes from a series on plant systematics created by Arnold Dodel-Port and his wife Carolina between 1878 and 1883.

The chart depicting the ergot fungus was based on research by Leopold Kny (1841-1916) and forms part of a series issued between 1874 and 1911, along with a 554-page explanatory textbook. So precise were Kny's drawings that they were still being used for educational purposes more than a century after the project began.

Send suggestions for this series on the treasures, oddities and curiosities owned by universities across the world to matthew.reisz@tsleducation.com.

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

A group of flamingos and a Marabou stork

A right-wing philosopher in Texas tells John Gill how a minority of students can shut down debates and intimidate lecturers – and why he backs Trump

men in office with feet on desk. Vintage

Three-quarters of respondents are dissatisfied with the people running their institutions

A face made of numbers looks over a university campus

From personalising tuition to performance management, the use of data is increasingly driving how institutions operate

students use laptops

Researchers say students who use computers score half a grade lower than those who write notes

Canal houses, Amsterdam, Netherlands

All three of England’s for-profit universities owned in Netherlands