Vince Cable attempts to woo Indian student market

Vince Cable is announcing a new set of measures designed to stem the fall in Indian students choosing to study in the UK

October 10, 2014

The business secretary has embarked on a week-long visit to India “to dispel myths that the UK is not welcoming to Indian students”, according to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

In a speech to the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry in Delhi, Mr Cable was set to highlight the contribution students from the country had made by studying in the UK.

“From Indira Gandhi – India’s first woman prime minister – to Olympic Park sculptor Anish Kapoor, UK universities have produced some of India’s most eminent and talented graduates and I want that legacy to continue,” he was due to say. 

“There is huge demand from UK employers for the high-level skills Indian graduates can offer, and students that gain graduate-level employment can stay here after completing their studies.”

Measures he was set to announce in Delhi include almost 400 new scholarships to study at institutions across the UK on courses such as engineering and IT and the launch of an awards scheme for Indian alumni of UK universities.

He was also set to announce a total of £33 million investment in projects to boost the UK’s business relationship with India.

simon.baker@tesglobal.com

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