Video: student builds Large Hadron Collider...from Lego

University of Liverpool PhD student wants models to be manufactured by the company

February 26, 2015

Ever wondered what the Large Hadron Collider would look like made out of Lego?

Well, now you can - albeit on a much smaller scale. Nathan Readioff, a PhD student in the University of Liverpool’s department of physics, is currently based at Cern, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in Geneva, which built the collider. He is studying the Higgs boson, and has used existing Lego pieces to design four detectors from the Large Hadron Collider.

“I had in mind Lego’s basic principles of encouraging imagination and play through building bricks,” Mr Readioff said of his creations.

He has submitted the designs to Lego, and if he attracts 10,000 votes on his proposal page, they will be considered by Lego for future production.

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