USS’ largest investments in companies, 2013

The Universities Superannuation Scheme has more than £466 million invested in banking giant HSBC, according to data from the pension scheme’s latest financial report

January 16, 2014

This amounts to 1.2 per cent of the pension pot and is the largest investment in a company made by the organisation.

More than £694 million, or 1.8 per cent of the fund, is invested in two of the largest oil companies worldwide, Royal Dutch Shell and BP.

Telephone giant the Vodafone Group (£306 million), pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline (£259 million) and manufacturer Nestlé (£205 million) also make it into the top six investment companies.

British American Tobacco and the British-Australian mining company Rio Tinto also feature in the top eight, according to the report published in the autumn.

holly.else@tsleducation.com

Times Higher Education free 30-day trial

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

Doctoral study can seem like a 24-7 endeavour, but don't ignore these other opportunities, advise Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O'Gorman

Matthew Brazier illustration (9 February 2017)

How do you defeat Nazis and liars? Focus on the people in earshot, says eminent Holocaust scholar Deborah Lipstadt

Improvement, performance, rankings, success

Phil Baty sets out why the World University Rankings are here to stay – and why that's a good thing

Warwick vice-chancellor Stuart Croft on why his university reluctantly joined the ‘flawed’ teaching excellence framework

people dressed in game of thrones costume

Old Germanic languages are back in vogue, but what value are they to a modern-day graduate? Alice Durrans writes