USS’ largest investments in companies, 2013

The Universities Superannuation Scheme has more than £466 million invested in banking giant HSBC, according to data from the pension scheme’s latest financial report

January 16, 2014

This amounts to 1.2 per cent of the pension pot and is the largest investment in a company made by the organisation.

More than £694 million, or 1.8 per cent of the fund, is invested in two of the largest oil companies worldwide, Royal Dutch Shell and BP.

Telephone giant the Vodafone Group (£306 million), pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline (£259 million) and manufacturer Nestlé (£205 million) also make it into the top six investment companies.

British American Tobacco and the British-Australian mining company Rio Tinto also feature in the top eight, according to the report published in the autumn.

holly.else@tsleducation.com

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