Top European Institutions in Psychiatry and Psychology

Data provided by Thomson Reuters from its Essential Science Indicators, January 2000-February 2010

June 24, 2010

Euro rankWorld rankInstitutionPapers CitationsCitations per paper
16 University of Cambridge 1,04520,852 19.95
2 11 University of Oxford 1,45026,812 18.49
3 17 Max Planck Society 1,42924,683 17.
4 18 King’s College London 3,44859,503 17.26
5 University College London 2,47438,790 15.68
6 33 University of Manchester 1,36120,255 14.88
7 51 Maastricht University 1,38717,812 12.84
8 52 Utrecht University 1,61620,69612.81
9 56 University of Amsterdam 1,45718,23412.51
10 64Free University, Amsterdam 1,007 10,810.75
1168 Radboud University, Nijmegen1,19612,33710.32
12 69 Leiden University 1,202 12,10310.07
1372 University of Groningen 1,29312,7449.86
The data above were extracted from the Essential Science Indicators database of Thomson Reuters. This database, currently covering the period January 2000 to February 2010, surveys only journal articles (original research reports and review articles) indexed by Thomson Reuters. Articles are assigned to a category based on the journals in which they were published and the Thomson Reuters journal-to-category field-definition scheme. Individual papers published in influential multidisciplinary journals such as Nature and Science are assigned to their appropriate fields. Both articles tabulated and citation counts are for the period indicated. Naturally, institutions publishing large numbers of papers have a greater likelihood of collecting more citations.

This ranking is by citations per paper (impact) for European institutions that published 1,000 or more papers in psychiatry and psychology during the period. For papers with multiple institutional addresses, each institution receives full, not fractional, citation credit. Essential Science Indicators lists institutions ranked in the top 1 per cent for a field over a given period, based on total citations. For the current version, 375 institutions are listed, meaning that a total of 37,500 institutions were surveyed to obtain these results.

Of the 375, 76 institutions published 1,000 or more papers. The ranking by citation impact seeks to reveal heavy hitters based on per-paper influence, not mere output or total citations. Also appearing is the world rank by impact for each of the institutions.

For more information, see http://science.thomsonreuters.com/products/esi

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