Today's news

March 1, 2006

Cambridge figures show rise in overseas students
The number of foreign students at Cambridge rose this year and there was a marginal increase in the numbers of successful candidates from UK state schools, according to figures published by the university today. The admissions figures for students starting in October 2005 confirm the trend among several leading universities of increasing the number of fee-paying overseas students to balance their books. Oxford has announced its intention to increase overseas numbers and at the London School of Economics more than half of all students are from outside the UK.
The Guardian

On the brink of a revolution
Undeterred by the spectacular crashes of the e-learning boom, the Open University and Manchester today announce an alliance to offer combined degrees overseas. Teams from the UK's two largest universities are now working to put flesh on the bones of the agreement, but there is no doubt about the ambitions of the two vice-chancellors, Brenda Gourley of the OU and Manchester's Alan Gilbert. "We want to change the world," Gourley said. Together they believe they will be well placed to cater for the exploding demand for higher education across the world with joint degrees that will carry an international cachet.
The Guardian

Granite City takes over historic college
Aberdeen's neo-gothic masterpiece, Marischal College, was officially handed over to the city council yesterday, clearing the way for the second-largest granite building in the world to become the new headquarters of the city authority. The council, which plans to turn the historic college into its new home by 2008, has signed a £4.7 million deal with Aberdeen University to lease two-thirds of the A-listed building for 175 years.
The Scotsman

Degree honour for Live 8 organiser
Live 8 organiser Midge Ure is to be awarded a second honorary degree. Ure will be honoured along with racing driver Jackie Stewart by Edinburgh University. The former Ultravox singer, from Cambuslang, near Glasgow, will be made an honorary Doctor of Music at a graduation ceremony on June 21. Stewart, a three-time Formula One World Champion, will receive his degree of Doctor honoris causa on July 13.
The Scotsman

Former Ritz cook named university chef of the year
Andrew Wood, who gave up his job as a top chef at the Ritz in London to cook dinners for university students in York, was today named university chef of the year. Mr Wood's menu of pea and ham soup followed by Whitby cod and Yorkshire Parkin was the winning combination at the competition cook-in at Earls Court in London where he faced eight other finalists.
The Guardian

Stem cell boost fails to help heart patients
Stem cell therapy appears unable to boost recovery among heart attack survivors, according to the largest study of this treatment to date. Previous research had suggested that supplemental stem cells could help cardiac tissue to regenerate and new blood vessels to form following a heart attack. “We may have to do a bit more basic science and then go back to the patients,” says Dietlind Zohlnhöfer at the German Heart Centre in Munich, who led the new study.
New Scientist

Giant squid caught by trawler goes on show
A giant squid as long as a London bus, with eyes bigger than saucers and daunting suckers goes on show today at the Natural History Museum. At 9m (30ft) long, the Architeuthis dux is the biggest on display in Britain, although half the size of those found so far. Scientists hope that the specimen will shed light on the mysterious deep-sea creatures.
The Times

'New Pompeii' uncovered on Indonesian island
Scientists say they have discovered a new Pompeii on one of the tropical islands of Indonesia, a town preserved under the ash from the biggest volcanic eruption of modern times. The researchers believe that what they have uncovered are the last remains of a civilisation that was wiped out by the cataclysmic eruption of Mount Tambora in 1815 on the island of Sumbawa.
The Independent

Letter
It was good practice to raise the profile of UCL.
The Financial Times

Letter
Civil incivility is required for better university governance.
The Financial Times

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