Times Higher Education's parent company acquires UniJobs

Acquisition of global jobs network marks further investment in “dynamic” higher education sector

April 13, 2015

Times Higher Education’s parent company, TES Global, has acquired the online global jobs network UniJobs, it was announced today.

The acquisition was described by Rob Grimshaw, TES Global’s chief executive, as a significant investment in a “dynamic sector that is undergoing rapid growth across both the developed and developing economies”.

The company’s ambition, he said, was “to transform the way both academic and professional support roles are filled by higher education institutions, matching global talent with global universities”.

UniJobs was founded in 2006 and is based in Melbourne, Australia. Its founder, Jarrod Kanizay, said that the acquisition by TES Global would bring with it “unparalleled international reach” for a jobs portal that already works with more than 700 institutions worldwide.

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