Student Loans Company staff sacked over Facebook posts

The Student Loans Company has sacked four people in the last five years for their inappropriate use of the social networking site Facebook

September 3, 2013

Employees used the site to post “inappropriate comments” that “brought the company into disrepute, and “derogatory remarks” aimed at both the company itself, and its “student customers”.

One member of staff was dismissed for comments that “threatened the health and safety of fellow employees”, according to a response to a Freedom of Information request made by the Parliament Street think tank.

“Our staff are expected to behave and communicate with other employees, customers and the wider public - whether through social media or any other communications channels - in a professional and responsible manner,” said Mhairi Docherty, head of human resources at the SLC.

“We do not tolerate abusive behaviour or threatening behaviour and we are committed to dealing robustly and appropriately with any cases of related misconduct to protect our customers and staff.”

Steven George-Hilley, director of technology at Parliament Street, added: “These incidents suggest it may be time for extra lessons in social media etiquette at the Student Loans Company.

“With correct training and policies in place, staff can use social networking sites like Facebook to share important application information and deliver interactive services to students.”

chris.parr@tsleducation.com

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