Scottish Highers pass rate rises again

The pass rate for Scottish Highers has risen again, while more Scottish students have also won places at universities or colleges in the country.

August 6, 2013

Exam results, released this morning by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA), have been sent to 150,986 candidates, a 5 per cent drop compared with 2012, due to an “expected fall” in the number of students entered for the qualifications.

However the number of Higher and Advanced Higher qualifications taken has risen, and figures from the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service show that 22,770 Scottish applicants have been accepted to a university or college in the country, a 2 per cent rise on the same point last year.

Ucas advised Scottish students to be “well prepared” ahead of trying to gain a university place through clearing. Last year 1,628 Scottish students managed to secure a place through this route.

The clearing system for Scotland will open this afternoon.

According to the Scottish Qualifications Authority, the pass rate for the Higher qualification rose 0.5 per cent to 77.4 per cent.

The pass rate for Advance Higher qualifications was 82.1 per cent, up 2 per cent compared with 2012.

There has been a steady increase in pass rates for both types of qualification over the past five years.

There were some Higher subjects where pass rates fell, however, including: mathematics (down 0.8 per cent); biology (down 1.7 per cent) and media studies (3.4 per cent).

david.matthews@tsleducation.com

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