Private college strikes overseas student deal with universities

A London-based private provider is to offer pathway programmes with a consortium of Northern universities, enabling international students to get on to degree courses

August 25, 2013

Maurits van Rooijen, chief executive of London School of Business and Finance

The London School of Business and Finance has said it will take on around 150 students to “provide students with the academic and English skills needed to progress to a leading university”.

These courses offer guaranteed progression to degree courses at 11 institutions, including the universities of Manchester, Leeds, Liverpool and Sheffield.

The Northern Consortium UK (NCUK), one of a number of firms offering foundation courses for international students hoping to study at a UK university, said it plans to open 30 new centres across the world over the next five years.

Piera Gerrard, marketing director for NCUK, said: “We are very pleased to be working with LSBF in this new partnership. LSBF and NCUK bring together a unique mix of academic rigour and marketing reach that will allow international students to gain a UK education through a world class portfolio of programmes.”

LSBF hopes to open NCUK courses at its Toronto and Singapore campuses in the future.

Maurits van Rooijen, chief executive of LSBF, said that “with NCUK and our network of agents, we aim to fulfil the international demand for British education at the same time as we shape the careers of global professionals.”

david.matthews@tsleducation.com

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