Paul Layzell named new principal of Royal Holloway

Sussex’s deputy vice-chancellor ‘delighted’ to take up London post, reports Rebecca Attwood

March 20, 2010

Royal Holloway, University of London, has named its new head.

Paul Layzell, who is currently deputy vice-chancellor at the University of Sussex, will take up his new post in August, the London institution announced on 19 March.

After gaining a degree in economics and accounting from the University of Manchester, Professor Layzell obtained his PhD in software engineering from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (Umist) and then took up a lectureship in its department of computation.

He went on to serve as pro vice-chancellor for resources and was programme manager for Umist’s merger with the University of Manchester in 2004. He moved to Sussex in 2006.

Professor Layzell said he was “delighted and privileged” to be appointed principal at Royal Holloway. “The college has an international reputation for the highest academic standards and this provides a strong base for future development,” he said.

“I am grateful to Professor Rob Kemp [acting principal] and his team for the leadership they have provided over the past year, and I shall be liaising with them closely as the college starts to address some very challenging issues.”

Professor Layzell is also chairman of AQA, one of the UK’s largest examination boards, and of Eduserv, an educational charity.

Sir Andrew Burns, chairman of Royal Holloway’s council, said he “warmly welcomed his outstanding track record in both research and education. The wealth of experience he has gained at Manchester and Sussex will be of great value to the college and will help us move forward positively and confidently in challenging times for higher education.”

Royal Holloway’s previous principal was Stephen Hill, who stepped down last summer.

A planned merger between Royal Holloway and St George’s, University of London, fell through in autumn 2009.

rebecca.attwood@tsleducation.com

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments