Staying for the next course

Participation up among students who had free school meals

August 6, 2015
Infographic: Participation up among students who had free school meals

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The number of students who received free school meals progressing into higher education is on the rise, according to a new estimate. The benefit is often used as an indicator of deprivation.

In 2005-06, just 13 per cent of students from state schools who received free school meals at the age of 15 entered higher education by the age of 19. But by 2012-13 this had risen to 23 per cent, says the report by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. 

Over the same period the progression rate for state-school pupils who did not receive free school meals increased by 7 percentage points, according to the report, Widening Participation in Higher Education, published in July.

holly.else@tesglobal.com

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Print headline: Staying for the next course: Participation up among students who had free school meals

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