Participation in higher education by ethnicity

Government statistics reveal that white school-leavers are less likely, proportionally, to enter higher education than those from other ethnic groups

October 29, 2015
Participation in higher education by ethnicity (29 October 2015)

View a high-resolution version


Data published by the Department for Education (DfE) show that 45 per cent of white students who took A levels or equivalent qualifications in 2012-13 entered higher education the following year, compared with 64 per cent of students described as being from an Asian background and 61 per cent of black school-leavers.

Black students were least likely to study at a Russell Group university, with only 7 per cent of them being admitted. The figures were 11 per cent for white students, and 13 per cent for students of Asian heritage.

The percentage of all 2012-13 school-leavers in “sustained destinations” – taking part in education or employment for at least two terms – the year after A levels was 73 per cent, up from 71 per cent the previous year. The proportion of students who were in higher education was unchanged, at 48 per cent.

chris.havergal@tesglobal.com

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

POSTSCRIPT:

Print headline: Whites least likely to move up: participation in higher education by ethnicity

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments