Odds and quads - 24 October 2013

The Women’s Library, based at the London School of Economics since the beginning of this year, is the UK’s leading resource for the study of women’s history and the women’s movement

October 24, 2013

Originally focused on material devoted to the struggle for the vote (such as the poster and the picture of Emmeline Pankhurst, above right), it now includes more than 60,000 books and pamphlets, 500 personal and organisational archives, posters and photographs, badges and banners. Hannah Woolley’s The Queene-like Closet or Rich Cabinet (1670) is a pioneering cookbook full of recipes said to be “very pleasant and beneficial to all ingenious persons of the female sex”.

These are among the 135 items selected for The Women’s Library @ LSE online, which presents a timeline of women’s battle for equality from the 16th century until the present day.

Among the other items are a copy of Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women (1792) and a document from the National Women’s Liberation Movement outlining its four demands. Each is accompanied by a description provided by experts from the library.

Send suggestions for this series on the treasures, oddities and curiosities owned by universities across the world to matthew.reisz@tsleducation.com

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford will host a homeopathy conference next month

Charity says Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford is ‘naive’ to hire out its premises for event

women leapfrog. Vintage

Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O’Gorman offer advice on climbing the career ladder

Woman pulling blind down over an eye
Liz Morrish reflects on why she chose to tackle the failings of the neoliberal academy from the outside
White cliffs of Dover

From Australia to Singapore, David Matthews and John Elmes weigh the pros and cons of likely destinations

Michael Parkin illustration (9 March 2017)

Cramming study into the shortest possible time will impoverish the student experience and drive an even greater wedge between research-enabled permanent staff and the growing underclass of flexible teaching staff, says Tom Cutterham