Odds and quads - 17 October 2013

These images form part of a forthcoming exhibition about the Victorian magazine Punch taking place at Liverpool John Moores University in celebration of the opening of the institution’s new Special Collections and Archives reading room

October 17, 2013

Its celebrated cartoons and gently satirical humour made Punch something of a national institution, and it became a regular feature of coffee tables, and of dentists’ and doctors’ waiting rooms, across the country. Until recently, however, it was largely neglected by academics.

This pioneering exhibition draws on the work of Clare Horrocks, senior lecturer in media, culture and communication, who secured a Liverpool John Moores early career fellowship (in partnership with the British Library) to work on Punch and other periodicals. Liverpool John Moores owns a complete run of the magazine from 1841, the year of its inception, to 1936.

Dr Horrocks said that the exhibition’s four cases of artefacts, 12 large posters of sample pages and copies of 19th-century magazines from the archives should offer “an alternative way for students to approach studying the Victorian periodical press”.

The exhibition runs from 22 October to 20 December, and may be viewed by appointment. An online version of the exhibition will present digitised versions of every image on display.

Send suggestions for this series on the treasures, oddities and curiosities owned by universities across the world to matthew.reisz@tsleducation.com

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

United Nations peace keeper

Understanding the unwritten rules of graduate study is vital if you want to get the most from your PhD supervision, say Kevin O'Gorman and Robert MacIntosh

David Parkins Christmas illustration (22 December 2016)

A Dickensian tale, set in today’s university

Eleanor Shakespeare illustration (5 January 2017)

Fixing problems in the academic job market by reducing the number of PhDs would homogenise the sector, argues Tom Cutterham

Houses of Parliament, Westminster, government

There really is no need for the Higher Education and Research Bill, says Anne Sheppard

poi, circus

Kate Riegle van West had to battle to bring her circus life and her academic life together