Odds and quads - 12 September 2013

September 12, 2013

The wax model of a dissected head, showing the arteries, tendons and muscles of the face, was used for teaching anatomy in the 19th or early 20th century in place of a real cadaver.

These items, together with a pair of embroidered gauntlet gloves from about 1600, rare scientific instruments and an Arctic narwhal’s tusk that was believed in the Middle Ages to have come from a unicorn, all form part of the Treasured exhibition, which continues at the University of St Andrews’ Gateway Galleries until 14 December.

Held to celebrate the 600th anniversary of the university, the exhibition brings together a sample of the gems long hidden away in its corridors and stores, many of which have never before been displayed publicly.

Send suggestions for this series on the treasures, oddities and curiosities owned by universities across the world to matthew.reisz@tsleducation.com

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