Non-EU students still attracted to UK universities

January 1, 2015

The number of students from the Middle East coming to UK universities more than doubled between 2003-04 and 2012-13. As traffic from all other regions also rose, the total number of non-European Union students in the UK grew by 59 per cent, says a recent Universities UK report.

Other regions to register large rises in traffic to the UK in the period included non-EU Europe, up 77 per cent, and Asia, up 63 per cent, according to Patterns and Trends in UK Higher Education.

Although numbers from the Middle East soared by 124 per cent over the nine years, the region still supplied less than 10 per cent of all non-EU students to UK institutions in 2012-13.

South America and Australasia had the least growth in traffic to the UK, up just 21 and 22 per cent respectively. Combined, the areas accounted for only 2 per cent of all non-EU students in 2012-13, says the report, released on 15 December.

Asia remained the biggest provider of foreign students to UK universities: 62 per cent of all international students originated there.

holly.else@tesglobal.com

Times Higher Education free 30-day trial

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

Daniel Mitchell illustration (29 June 2017)

Academics who think they can do the work of professional staff better than professional staff themselves are not showing the kind of respect they expect from others

celebrate, cheer, tef results

Emilie Murphy calls on those who challenged the teaching excellence framework methodology in the past to stop sharing their university ratings with pride

A podium constructed out of wood

There are good reasons why some big names are missing from our roster

Senior academics at Teesside University put at risk of redundancy as summer break gets under way

Thorns and butterflies

Conditions that undermine the notion of scholarly vocation – relentless work, ubiquitous bureaucracy – can cause academics acute distress and spur them to quit, says Ruth Barcan