More Scottish students entering higher education

The number of Scottish students winning a higher education place is up despite a slight fall in the pass rate for Scottish Highers

August 5, 2014

Ucas figures released today show that 24,480 Scottish-domiciled applicants had been accepted as of midnight last night, a 4 per cent increase on Highers results day last year.

The number accepted on to courses fell in 2011 but has risen every year since 2012.

Meanwhile, as pupils across Scotland receive their exam results today, the Highers pass rate has fallen to 77.1 per cent, down from 77.4 per cent last year. But aside from the blip this year, it has still risen steadily since 2010.

Students domiciled in Scotland pay no tuition fees to attend universities north of the border, but will have to pay up to £9,000 elsewhere in the UK. The vast majority – all but 700 – of the Scottish students who have won a place are attending a Scottish institution.

Those without a place can now apply for other courses through clearing. Ucas said that last year more than 1,500 students won a place this way.

Fatuma Mahad, Ucas director of operations, told students in a statement: “Staying positive will put you on the front foot if you’re looking for a place in clearing. Remember that the best way to succeed is to prepare thoroughly then call universities and colleges for an intelligent discussion about the courses you’re interested in. You’ll find all the information you need on the Ucas website.”

david.matthews@tsleducation.com

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