Mapped out: negative perceptions of science

This map shows that across Africa, India, Central America and parts of the Middle East, people are more likely to believe that one of the “bad effects” of science is that it “breaks down ideas of right and wrong”

December 22, 2016
Mapped out: negative perceptions of science (22 December 2016)

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This view was less common in parts of Europe, in Australia and the US, but even in richer countries the average score – where one means “completely disagree” and 10 “completely agree” – was normally about four or five.

The results are based on a questionnaire of at least 1,000 people per country by the World Values Survey, conducted between 2010 and 2014.

david.matthews@tesglobal.com

Note: countries in white not included in the survey

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