Lords of the faculties

November 24, 1995

Three academics are among the 11 life peers announced last week who will bolster the main parties' working strength in the House of Lords.

John Sewel, vice principal of Aberdeen University and Robert Winston, professor of fertility studies at London University, both become Labour peers, while William Wallace, reader in international relations at the London School of Economics, becomes a Liberal Democrat peer.

Professor Sewel, dean of Aberdeen's faculty of social sciences and law, and former leader of Aberdeen City Council, has been involved in developing proposals for a Scottish parliament. He said he was looking forward to helping secure the legislative programme of the next Labour Government. "A major element will be the establishment of a parliament for Scotland as the first stage in the development of devolved government throughout the United Kingdom."

Professor Winston, dean of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School, directs one of the largest infertility clinics in the world, which receives about 8,000 patients a year. "I'm very concerned about higher education and would aim to take every opportunity to address issues raised by higher education politically," Professor Winston said.

Dr Wallace has been researching the redefinition of European borders after the Cold War, and the future of United States and British foreign policy. He is also part-time professor of international studies at the Central European University.

He will speak mainly on international issues and foreign policy in the Lords, but said he would retain an interest in higher education.

"One of the large issues is how the top tier of universities have to adjust to mass higher education."

The other new Liberal Democrat peer, Tom McNally, head of public affairs at Shandwick Consultants and former Labour MP for Stockport South, is a fellow of University College London.

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