Heavy traffic for the biggest graduate employers

Public administration, education and health are the UK’s top graduate employers, according to the latest Office for National Statistics report on the national labour force

December 5, 2013

More than 40 per cent of graduates work in these fields, compared with 22 per cent of non-graduates, according to data spanning April to June this year.

It is common for graduates from a variety of subject backgrounds to join these industries because of the wide range of jobs on offer, the report says.

Those with degrees in medicine, medical-related subjects and education have particularly well-defined career paths.

The only other industries to employ a higher percentage of graduates than non-graduates are banking and finance (just over 20 per cent compared with 14 per cent).

Source: Labour Force Survey, Office for National Statistics

holly.else@tsleducation.com

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