Harlem Shake ‘costs Oxford librarian her job’

A librarian at a University of Oxford college has reportedly lost her job after a group of 30 students filmed an internet dance video in the library.

March 19, 2013

According to a student news website, Calypso Nash, who is also a graduate student at St Hilda’s College, was dismissed for failing to prevent the students from filming themselves taking part in a Harlem Shake – an internet craze that depicts people suddenly dancing crazily, often in costume.

The video, which has been viewed thousands of times, features a woman holding a sign reading “Free Pussy Riot”, referring to the Russian feminist punk rock collective, several of whom are currently imprisoned. Another dancer is sporting a horse’s head mask, while a third appears to be dressed as a bear.

Students at St Hilda’s are calling for Ms Nash to be reinstated, Oxford student news website Cherwell.org reported. The college’s Junior Common Room has passed a motion requesting “a written reason for the decision from the head librarian” and for the matter to be “brought to the attention of the governing body”.

Ellen Gibson, a student at St Hilda’s, told the website: “The situation seems ridiculous. The librarian had nothing to do with the protest; she just happened to be there at the time.”

A spokesman for St Hilda’s told Times Higher Education the college did not wish to make a comment at this time.

chris.parr@tsleducation.com

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