Graduates and the gender pay gap

Women graduating from part-time degrees go on to earn £7,500 less on average than their male equivalents, according to new data on higher education leavers

August 7, 2014

The salary differential between the sexes on completion of a part-time degree has jumped up by £2,000 over the past year.

In 2011-12, men enjoyed a mean salary of £31,500 six months after graduation, compared with £26,000 for women, according to the Higher Education Statistics Agency. But in 2012-13, men’s salaries rose by £1,000 to £32,500, while women’s salaries fell by £1,000 to £25,000.

By comparison, the salary difference between the sexes six months after graduating from full-time study is £2,000. Unlike part-time leavers, both men and women saw a £500 rise in mean salaries between 2011-12 and 2012-13. The mean average salary of men who completed a full-time degree now stands at £21,500, compared with £19,500 for women.

holly.else@tsleducation.com

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