Global scholars recruited by Canadian institute

Initiative singles out young scholars who have the potential to forge new techniques and ways of thinking

September 20, 2016
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A Canadian institute with global reach has appointed its first cohort in a new scheme that aims to attract some of the world's best early career researchers.

The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research has appointed 18 CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholars as part of a programme designed to enable exceptional young scholars, within five years of their first academic appointment, to develop the networks and skills they need to become leaders in global research. 

Each will receive $100,000 (£77,000) and have been appointed to one of CIFAR’s 14 research streams – in crucial areas such as child development, solar energy and quantum computing – for a period of two years.

Although based in Canada, CIFAR is a worldwide organisation, made up of nearly 400 fellows, scholars and advisers from more than 130 institutions in 17 countries. 

All the CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholars will get an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback from more senior CIFAR fellows. They will also get a chance to reach beyond the usual boundaries of the academy and engage with the policy-makers and business leaders likely to benefit from their research.

“This group of phenomenal young investigators is the future of research,” says CIFAR president and chief executive Alan Bernstein.

“The enthusiasm and energy that they bring to research is invaluable for developing new ways of thinking, new techniques in science, and innovative solutions for the challenges facing our world today.”

The first cohort of CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholars, who will receive support from the Azrieli Foundation, a Canadian philanthropic organisation, include young academics from Austria, China and Israel as well as Canada and the US.

The next open call for such scholars will begin on 1 March 2017, when it is hoped to attract applicants from all six continents.

matthew.reisz@tesglobal.com

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