Glasgow don runs up funds

June 1, 2001

Neil Garrod's web diary covers more ground than most - the 1,500 miles between Rome and Glasgow.

Professor Garrod, dean of Glasgow's faculty of law and financial studies, is marking the university's 550th anniversary by recreating the journey of the papal bull that authorised Glasgow's bishop to establish a university.

Professor Garrod is equipped not only with trainers but also a laptop and mobile phone.

David Thom, systems manager in Glasgow's maths and statistics department, is putting Professor Garrod's emails on a website.

Topics so far include "The camper van is broken into" and "Well-mannered Swiss drivers". The site attracts an average of 2,6 daily hits, from countries such as Slovenia and Australia.

Sponsorship for the run will go to the university's anniversary development campaign, aimed at supporting students.

Details: http:/// </a>

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