From today's UK papers

March 6, 2002

Middle classes to pay more for their campus days
Middle-class university students would have to pay more for their education under plans being drawn up by ministers. A review of loans and fees to be published this summer is expected to conclude that students should pay close to market rates of interest on their loans. At the moment rates are linked to inflation, costing the Treasury about £700 million a year. (Times)

Teachers vote for first strike over pay in 30 years
Thousands of children in London and the Southeast will have lessons disrupted next week after teachers voted yesterday for a one-day strike over pay, for the first time for 30 years. Estelle Morris, the secretary of state for education, warned teaching unions that a return to "the dark ages of dispute and conflict" would harm children's education and damage teachers' reputation with the public. (Independent, Daily Telegraph, Financial Times, Guardian)

Israeli student 'spy ring' revealed
American authorities  today revealed they have arrested and deported dozens of young Israelis they suspect were part of a giant spy ring. Up to 120 Israelis have been arrested since early last year after claiming they were art students and trying to gain access to sensitive government buildings. (Guardian)

Support grows for cloning ban
The passage of a US law banning all cloning, including for therapeutic purposes, seemed more likely yesterday after sponsors of a Senate bill said they had pulled together a broad coalition in support. (Financial Times)

Plagiarism row topples Pulitzer judge
Doris Kearns Goodwin, one of America's best-known popular historians, stepped down as a Pulitzer prize judge yesterday in the face of mounting allegations that she had lifted many passages in her acclaimed work from other writers' books.  (Guardian)

50 per cent think science mercenary
One in two people believes that scientists are in the pockets of big business and that scientific research has become too commercialised.  According to a poll to be released today by the Royal Society, the same proportion of people want more influence over the type of research carried out. The Mori poll of 1,001 people marks the Royal Society's first National Forum for Science. (Daily Telegraph)

Pollution 'as dangerous as passive smoking'
Traffic fumes and city smog significantly increase the risks of dying from lung cancer and heart disease, according to one of the most detailed studies into the dangers of air pollution. Long-term exposure to the small particulates that make up urban pollution is as bad for the health as second-hand cigarette smoke, the report concludes. (Daily Telegraph)

Chops from older sheep face ban in BSE move
A ban on mutton chops and lamb stew is being considered by government scientists to prevent the possible spread of CJD. Stopping consumption of lamb aged over a year, or "on the bone", is one of the options being looked at to reduce the risk of people developing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease or "human BSE". (Daily Telegraph)

Tokyo and Seoul to master past
Scholars from South Korea and Japan are to research the two countries' history together in an attempt to avoid a repeat of last year's row about the contents of a Japanese school textbook. A research organisation, launched yesterday by the two governments will bid to resolve differences in the neighbours' views of the past and help Seoul and Tokyo understand each other better as they prepare to co-host June's soccer World Cup finals. (Financial Times)

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