From today's UK papers

January 14, 2002

Jobs a-plenty in Milton Keynes
Milton Keynes boasts the highest growth in employment in Britain over the past decade. A total of 36,100 jobs were created between 1991 and 2001, according to a study of 150 towns and cities by Business Strategies, an economics analysis unit. (Independent)

Safeguards fail at gene bank says watchdog
Planned safeguards in BioBank UK, the world's biggest medical research gene bank, are inadequate to protect the donated genes of half a million Britons from snooping and excessive commercial exploitation, GeneWatch UK warns today. (Guardian)

Scientists alarmed over bio warfare papers
Hundreds of sensitive documents written by scientists for the United States biological weapons programme in the early days of the Cold War remain available to the public, despite the recent anthrax scare and increasing concern about groups such as al-Qa'ida waging germ warfare. (Independent)

'Rita' syndrome takes toll on marriages
The "Educating Rita" syndrome is alive and well in further and higher education, new research suggests. A study for the National Institute for Adult and Continuing Education has found that women who return to learning often face a marriage breakdown. (Independent)

Antarctic cools in warmer world
The Antarctic has cooled during the past 35 years despite the worldwide temperature rise, according to a study published by the American National Science Foundation today. The findings challenge the belief that global warming is raising temperatures across the whole of the southern continent. (Daily Telegraph)

New El Niño to bring weather chaos
A new El Niño, the periodic warming of the surface of the Pacific ocean that can trigger severe worldwide weather and environmental disasters, has been observed building up by the US National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. (Guardian)

Minke farm is whalers' big idea
A Japanese city, Hirado in Nagasaki prefecture, is planning to farm whales in a bay 620 south west of Tokyo, to entertain tourists, to study breeding behaviour and ultimately, to supply restaurants with meat. (Guardian)

Foreign nurses to learn English banter
Nurses recruited overseas are being offered courses in colloquial English and lessons in what makes Britons laugh featuring shows including Fawlty Towers , The Two Ronnies , and Coronation Street . (Daily Telegraph)

   

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