From today's UK papers

October 8, 2001

The Independent

Oxford University scientists have discovered methods to detect breast cancer that will lead to earlier and more accurate diagnoses.

Financial Times

US business students remained level-headed in the chaos of September 11. But the day has changed their world, says Victoria Griffith.

A two-hat dean: Darden business school appointment combines academic and corporate experience, says Della Bradshaw.

The Times

More than one-third of employed people in Britain would sooner have a shorter working week, even if it meant a proportionate cut in income. As many as 40 per cent of women workers would prefer to work fewer hours at the same hourly rate, according to a report from the University of Essex.

The Guardian

Iain Duncan Smith can become prime minister within five years if the Conservatives achieve what they failed to do under William Hague and persuade "turned off" voters that they really care about health and education, and that Labour is a threat to their continuing prosperity, Michael Ancram argues.

A Whitehall think-tank has recommended that religion be abolished as a basis for charity tax concessions. Meanwhile, home secretary David Blunkett is seeking a stronger definition of religion as part of his drive to outlaw incitement to racial hatred.

British pharmaceuticals company GlaxoSmithKline has given a South African company the right to make cheap copies of its anti-Aids drugs.

A-level students and their parents must be hoping the education secretary Estelle Morris races through her review of student finance, which apparently got under way in the summer although it was only announced at the Labour party conference last week.

Daily Mail

The Salvation Army wants to launch a state-funded secondary schools in Britain. The charity is one of a number of religious groups that may bid for government cash as part of a shake-up of secondary education.   

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