First-year taught postgraduate student numbers 2007-13

June 12, 2014

Despite fears about a slow-down in international demand for UK university places, there were still more overseas students starting taught postgraduate courses in the UK in 2012-13 than in 2007-08, according to a report. But the opposite is true for home students.

The Universities UK report reveals that almost 91,500 non-European Union students started taught postgraduate courses in 2012-13, down from a peak of more than 95,200 students in 2010-11, but up from the 66,200 that started in 2007-08.

EU students showed a similar pattern, with about 3,600 more students starting in 2012-13 than in 2007-08, according to Postgraduate Taught Education: The Funding Challenge.

But the number of home students starting taught courses peaked a year earlier than international students with just over 189,000 starting in 2009-10, up almost 25,900 on 2007-08. New starters then fell to about 156,400 in 2012-13.

holly.else@tsleducation.com

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