Fee cap frozen in Wales for three years

The maximum annual tuition fee for universities in Wales is to be frozen at £9,000 for the next three years, the Welsh Government has announced.

September 14, 2012

In a written statement, education minister Leighton Andrews also confirmed details of the country's support package for new students.

The maximum tuition fee loan available to those ordinarily resident in Wales will increase by the rate of inflation in each academic year, the minister said, meaning next year's maximum loan will be £3,575.

A tuition fee grant from the devolved government will continue to cover the remaining element of tuition fees, wherever in the UK Welsh students choose to study.

"In November 2010, I announced new arrangements for tuition fees and student support in Wales," Mr Andrews says in his statement.

"Students ordinarily resident in Wales are eligible for a non-means tested tuition fee grant to cover the additional costs of fees wherever in the UK they choose to study."

Most universities in Wales currently charge the maximum £9,000 per year, although several institutions have announced their intention to drop fees to around £7,500 next year. However, these universities could opt to increase their fees again in the future.

"Even though we are still facing tough economic and financial conditions we are sticking up for our students in Wales. The Welsh government believes that finance should not be a barrier to a university education," Mr Andrews says.

chris.parr@tsleducation.com

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