Exeter goes to the top of the cap

The University of Exeter, which is led by Steve Smith, president of Universities UK, plans to set undergraduate tuition fees at £9,000 a year, the maximum allowed.

March 2, 2011

Exeter, a member of the 1994 Group of smaller research-intensive universities, said today that the proposed fee level for 2012 had been endorsed by its governing body.

The university is also developing a new package of fee waivers and bursaries to encourage more applications from less well-off students.

David Allen, registrar and deputy chief executive of Exeter, said: “This will better enable us to direct resources at widening participation, fair access and improving the student experience. It is important that students can come and study at Exeter whatever their family background. We are already working with our Students’ Guild to identify priorities for investing in the student experience.”

The plans are subject to the approval of a fair-access and widening-participation agreement with the Office for Fair Access.

UUK has attracted criticism from some for what has been perceived as its lacklustre response to government funding cuts.

However, in setting fees at £9,000 a year, Professor Smith has ignored lobbying by David Willetts, the universities and science minister, who has urged vice-chancellors to keep fees down.

rebecca.attwood@tsleducation.com

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