Worth lobbying for

March 17, 2016

I applaud Ben Goldacre for extolling the virtues of non-profit lobbying (“Ban academics talking to ministers? We should train them to do it”, Opinion, 10 March). There are numerous issues that are worthy of a noble pursuit, such as the empowerment of women, interfaith dialogue, human rights and disability, the battle against anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and radicalisation, and the elimination of racism, poverty and war. This journey can be so long, so frustrating, so thankless, but it is so fulfilling.

I am a Jordanian citizen. I have been moved by how our tiny country has accommodated millions of refugees from war-stricken countries, offering them shelter, education, healthcare, water, food, sanitation and employment, equivalent to what local Jordanians get; all in line with our Islamic magnanimity and Hashemite traditions; and all despite our scarce natural resources. If lobbying teaches us anything, it is that fighting for global serenity, religious freedom and hope in the face of uncertainties are worth fighting for.

Munjed Farid Al Qutob
London


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