Unsung classics

March 31, 2016

I was very glad to see Emma Gee raise the issue of the translation of Classics and its scholarly nature and potential to engage the public (“Classics’ elitism should be lost in translation”, 17 March). And yet, the vast majority of Greek and Latin literature does not exist in any modern language. It is inaccessible to nearly everyone. One need merely think of the 300 volumes of the Patrologia Graeca and Latina. Then there are languages such as classical Armenian, Syriac, Christian Arabic – all full of material that might be of use, and very little of which exists in English.

We need to change the structure of research funding such that creating the first English translation of some text is itself worth funding. We don’t need a 2,999th version of the Iliad or the Odyssey; we do need the very first version of most ancient texts.

Roger Pearse
Via timeshighereducation.com

Send to

Letters should be sent to: THE.Letters@tesglobal.com
Letters for publication in Times Higher Education should arrive by 9am Monday.
View terms and conditions.

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments

Reader's comments (1)

Roger Pearse has valiantly constructed websites and links to enable anyone to read patristic texts in any language. Before Cherrie and her neoCatholic spouse coined the canard that Classics was elitist, Latin and Greek were taught in schools and universities, indeed some of us can remember when exams in Greek had to be passed by theologians, and in Latin by every applicant to Oxbridge. In the USA Latin is still taught for free, "Hispanics" do better at it than "WASPS" And I have never met a mathematician who regretted their Latin classes.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

Home secretary says government will support 'best' universities

Man handing microphone to audience member

Academic attainment of disadvantaged students can be improved if they can decide how they are assessed, study claims

Woman drinking tea from saucer

Plugging a multibillion-pound deficit exacerbated by June’s poll result may require ‘drastic measures’, analysts have warned

Italy's gold medallist

New measures to ensure universities are ‘not penalised’ for taking poorer students also outlined for next stage of TEF

Classroom, school

Higher education institutions can and should do more to influence education at a secondary school level, says Edward Peck