No laughing matter

March 10, 2016

In Luke Burns’ commentary on teaching excellence, he states that even the “driest of subjects” can be made interesting (“Teaching excellence: substance, delivered with style”, Opinion, 24 February).

Geography unavoidably holds dry areas, but he asserts that any discipline’s content can be improved by applying stylistic methods and the ability to enthuse. However, since each short episode of Fawlty Towers took six weeks to prepare, should we be cautious about increasing lecturers’ working hours? In academia, the content rarely includes a Spanish waiter or Germans.

Neil Richardson
Kirkheaton


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