Future-proofing Heythrop

August 20, 2015

In the weeks since the difficult decision was made that Heythrop College would cease being a constituent college of the University of London in three years, our governors and staff have been gratified and encouraged by the many letters and messages of support that we have received, including “Don’t shut down Heythrop College” (Letters, 6 August).

Correspondents have underlined the quality of our teaching and research and the significant contribution that the college has made to the lives of many individuals, to the Church, to the academy and to wider society.

Alas, despite so many expressions of support, it has not been possible to identify, either in the past three years while researching alternative models or in the weeks since the governing body’s decision was made, a robust financial plan that can sustain the college in its current form in today’s funding environment.

We are now focused on giving students the best possible experience over the next three years and on working with the Society of Jesus, our friends and supporters, to find a way in which the work of Heythrop can continue beyond 2018 in a new, financially sustainable form.

We hope that many people, including those who signed the letter that appeared in Times Higher Education, will share with us their ideas about how that future might look and, when the time comes, will be able to lend their support to the college in its new form.

Andrew Kennedy
Chair of governors, Heythrop College

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