Evaluator victor

April 28, 2016

As a coordinator of one of the sub-groups evaluating research in Italy’s present VQR (“Evaluation of Research Quality”), I can assure the UK public that our evaluation procedure is alive and well (“Academics in Italy have boycotted assessment. What has it achieved?”, Opinion, 21 April).

The participation rate has dropped by only 3.3 percentage points from the previous VQR (95.3 per cent to 92 per cent). There is a stable 5 per cent of professors who are not publishing anything, so that 8 per cent drops to 3 per cent who are real protesters.

I agree completely with colleagues who are protesting nationwide about salaries and funding, but I do not think that they have chosen the right action. Having scarce governmental funds distributed according to merit and not academic camarillas is a common interest. The present method has some shortcomings but nobody really wants to go back to the past.

Carlo Natali
Via timeshighereducation.com

Send to

Letters should be sent to: THE.Letters@tesglobal.com
Letters for publication in Times Higher Education should arrive by 9am Monday.
View terms and conditions.

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

Home secretary says government will support 'best' universities

Man handing microphone to audience member

Academic attainment of disadvantaged students can be improved if they can decide how they are assessed, study claims

Woman drinking tea from saucer

Plugging a multibillion-pound deficit exacerbated by June’s poll result may require ‘drastic measures’, analysts have warned

Italy's gold medallist

New measures to ensure universities are ‘not penalised’ for taking poorer students also outlined for next stage of TEF

Classroom, school

Higher education institutions can and should do more to influence education at a secondary school level, says Edward Peck