Cafe culture

May 5, 2016

When I arrived at the University of the West of England, the applied sciences department had no staffroom, no tea and coffee; just the cafes on campus (“Members-only staffroom splits opinion”, News, 28 April).

I lobbied for one and now we have the envy of the faculty (and maybe the rest of the university) and it’s simple. Any staff in the faculty can use the space (lunch, research group meetings and so on), but pay just £5 a month and you get unlimited tea, coffee, hot chocolate and such. Members of the coffee club keep it tidy, get milk when we’ve run out and make pots of coffee for others because they care, because it’s a club that we own, not the university. My faculty has even recently offered to invest in improving the space itself because of the positive impact it has seen the room and the coffee club have on staff.

chris_p_moore_253705
Via timeshighereducation.com


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