Social diversity in BTECs

January 29, 2015

I was pleased to read that the number of students holding BTEC qualifications who have been accepted on to university courses has doubled since 2008 (“Gender gaps among students revealed by Ucas”, www.timeshighereducation.co.uk, 21 January).

I think that it is also important to highlight what this analysis from Ucas doesn’t say, which is that 40 per cent of students entering university with BTECs have parents who come from lower socio-economic backgrounds. For A-level entry students, the figure is just 20 per cent. We are proud that BTECs offer a socially diverse mix of young people a proven route to both higher education and the world of work.

Rod Bristow
President of UK and core markets
Pearson (owner of the BTEC qualifications)

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