Russian research risks

January 16, 2014

Sheila Fitzpatrick has written an enthralling and lightly humorous account, A Spy in the Archives: A Memoir of Cold War Russia, of the trials and tribulations of researching in the Soviet archives during the 1960s (News, 2 January). It was a time in the Cold War when the USSR bureaucracy was stable and, with effort, could become a known quantity.

Those of us who worked in Moscow immediately after the USSR imploded found things more unpredictable. In my own case, it did not help matters that A. V. Brushlinsky, director of the Russian Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Psychology, with whom I had excellent relations, was brutally murdered in February 2002.

R. E. Rawles
Honorary research fellow in psychology
University College London

Times Higher Education free 30-day trial

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

Laurel and Hardy sawing a plank of wood

Working with other academics can be tricky so follow some key rules, say Kevin O'Gorman and Robert MacIntosh

Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford will host a homeopathy conference next month

Charity says Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford is ‘naive’ to hire out its premises for event

Woman pulling blind down over an eye
Liz Morrish reflects on why she chose to tackle the failings of the neoliberal academy from the outside
White cliffs of Dover

From Australia to Singapore, David Matthews and John Elmes weigh the pros and cons of likely destinations

women leapfrog. Vintage

Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O’Gorman offer advice on climbing the career ladder