Rigged results

October 31, 2013

The BUAV welcomes public discussion about animal experiments (“Animal research under the microscope”, 17 October). However, the fundamental flaw in universities hosting the Big Animal Research Debate is that they are at the same time arguing for a veto under the Freedom of Information Act over what data they have to make public on the subject. This is hypocrisy: self-evidently, one cannot have informed debate without information, and one party to the debate should not be able to control access to the data.

Successive undercover investigations by the BUAV have demonstrated the reality for animals used in experiments and the often poor standards of care they face far more graphically than a series of student discussions. In addition, human health dictates the need for much greater transparency so that there can be rigorous discussion about what works and what does not: the record of animal research is often extremely poor, as more and more scientists are recognising.

If researchers at UK universities really have confidence in their ethical and scientific case, let them prove it by being truly open about their research and subject it to rigorous review, rather than simply constructing a carefully controlled “debate”.

Katy Taylor
Head of science
The BUAV
London

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

Monster behind man at desk

Despite all that’s been done to improve doctoral study, horror stories keep coming. Here three students relate PhD nightmares while two academics advise on how to ensure a successful supervision

celebrate, cheer, tef results

Emilie Murphy calls on those who challenged the teaching excellence framework methodology in the past to stop sharing their university ratings with pride

Sir Christopher Snowden, former Universities UK president, attacks ratings in wake of Southampton’s bronze award

Reflection of man in cracked mirror

To defend the values of reason from political attack we need to be more discriminating about the claims made in its name, says John Hendry

But the highest value UK spin-off companies mainly come from research-intensive universities, latest figures show