Passing the baton

March 12, 2015

I was fascinated to learn David Eastwood’s thoughts on being a vice-chancellor, although like many, I suspect, of your musician readers, slightly doubtful about his allusion to sonata form (“Know the score”, Features, 5 March).

The tension between two different keys and (sometimes) moods in the exposition is really the thing, and later obsession with extensive development can be tiring. I suspect that vice-chancellors who try too much development end up improvising, which is also a mistake unless one is very able. And I’m sure that our own much loved vice-chancellor would baulk at the prospect of orchestration too. This is really very difficult and I know that he would happily leave it to the experts, even perhaps questioning the morality of attempting the task with people rather than instruments.

A really successful vice-chancellor (such as ours) makes sure that the musicians have the resources they need, and will watch the conductor’s back.

Ben Hall
Department of music, University of Chichester

Times Higher Education free 30-day trial

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

Monster behind man at desk

Despite all that’s been done to improve doctoral study, horror stories keep coming. Here three students relate PhD nightmares while two academics advise on how to ensure a successful supervision

Female professor

New data show proportion of professors who are women has declined at some institutions

opinion illustration

Eliminating cheating services, even if it were possible, would do nothing to address students’ and universities’ lack of interest in learning, says Stuart Macdonald

Reflection of man in cracked mirror

To defend the values of reason from political attack we need to be more discriminating about the claims made in its name, says John Hendry

But the highest value UK spin-out companies mainly come from research-intensives, latest figures show