Madness in the method

November 6, 2014

At a recent meeting with the National College for Teaching and Leadership, we sought to understand the methodology that has seen the agency deliver swingeing cuts in allocated teacher training student numbers to the University of Cumbria for the third year in succession (“Future of teacher training under threat”, News, 23 October).

The NCTL’s clear line was that we could challenge it only if we could prove that its methodology had been unfairly applied. A challenge to the methodology itself would not be considered, irrespective of its consequences, as it had been approved by ministers.

How ironic then to see the prime minister in a state of apoplectic indignation as he contemplates the effects of the application of a bit of methodology in regard to the European Union budget. He clearly believes this to be unfair, but is also told that he cannot challenge it. I sympathise with David Cameron – being treated with contempt is not a nice feeling.

Peter Strike
Vice-chancellor, University of Cumbria

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