Healthy percentage

June 27, 2013

You recently cited figures showing that about one in 10 of Bath Spa University’s professors is female (“Gender gap still yawns among professoriate”, News, 13 June). It is of the nature of these reports that the statistics are out of date. The article did include updates from other universities; I would like to add our own.

Since I arrived in 2012 a number of outstanding women have been made professors, including Fay Weldon, Tessa Hadley, Kate Pullinger, Aminatta Forna, Naomi Alderman and Maggie Gee on our creative writing programme. Amanda Bayley has been appointed professor of music, and this month Anita Taylor arrives as dean of the Bath School of Art and Design.

In addition, two women have been promoted to professorial positions this year – Denise Cush in philosophy of religion and education, and Elaine Chalus in British history.

This means that of 44 Bath Spa professors, 12 are women.

Christina Slade
Vice-chancellor
Bath Spa University

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