Definition of the mission

January 22, 2015

In Bahram Bekhradnia’s argument for making higher education less dependent on the market and instead providing more financial support through taxpayers (“Step back to look ahead”, Opinion, 15 January), he describes the sector as one that “everybody agrees is essential for national well-being”. However, in order to reach such agreement we need a sharp definition of purpose. For instance, is the sector’s mission to welcome only those interviewees who demonstrate a keen concern for their carefully chosen subjects? Or is the aim to transform all who seem willing to mix amiably with their peers and attend at least 60 per cent of lectures?

Neil Richardson
Kirkheaton

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